Archive for October, 2013

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We recently bought our twin girls, Mattie and Macie, a set of cheap magna doodles. My wife purchased them at a local store for three dollars. The girls loved them. Mattie especially loved hers and she wanted to take it everywhere she went. She held it while she ate, took in the car and she even took it to church. She would cry if we took it away.

If you’re not familiar with the magna doodle, it is a drawing board that utilizes magnets to create an image with a special magnetic pen. As you move the pen along the surface of the board, tiny magnetic particles come to the surface to form the image you are drawing. The image can quickly be erased by sliding a plastic handle from one side to the other. Then you have a clean slate on which to draw.

The girls loved to sit in my lap and scribble on the magna doodles. I would try to draw silly characters and faces for them, but, before I could finish, they would always scribble on my drawing or move the lever to erase it. They never seemed to let me finish.

This simple story reminds me of a lesson The Lord taught me while I was having my devotions. I was studying in Exodus and ran across this passage:

“And the Lord said unto Moses, Hew thee two tables of stone like unto the first: and I will write upon these tables the words that were in the first tables, which thou brakest. And be ready in the morning, and come up in the morning unto mount Sinai, and present thyself there to me in the top of the mount. And no man shall come up with thee, neither let any man be seen throughout all the mount; neither let the flocks nor herds feed before that mount.
And he hewed two tables of stone like unto the first; and Moses rose up early in the morning, and went up unto mount Sinai, as the Lord had commanded him, and took in his hand the two tables of stone.” – Exodus 34:1-4

The Lord had given the children of Israel the law written by the His own finger on tablets of stone. When Moses came down from mount Sinai to present the law, he was horrified to find Israel worshiping an idol that they had constructed. They had broken the very laws Moses came to give them. Moses threw down the tablets and destroyed them, and God judged His people.

Being a God of second chances, The Lord told Moses to chisel out two new stones and bring them up the mountain where God could write the law on them again. Moses went to God with a blank slate.

This is a perfect picture of our fallen nature. We come to God with prayers and petitions and He lays His will and way on our hearts, and, before we know it, we’ve broken God’s laws. We want our way and our agenda accomplished and seldom do we sit in the lap of God and receive His instruction. We never let Him finish. Just like my twin baby girls, we paint a primitive picture of how we want our life to be. We fail to wait and let the Divine Artist finish His masterpiece.

We need to come before God with a blank slate. We need to leave behind our selfish wants and ambitions and sit at the feet of the Master and receive His instruction. As we yield the pen, He will paint a picture more beautiful than we can conceive. Let us lay aside our list of petitions and open our ears to the wants and desires of our Heavenly Father.

Eventually, the magna doodles broke. The pens lost their tips and the handle didn’t work right anymore, and the girls have moved on to playing with other things, but I’ll never see a magna doodle again without thinking of the lesson of Moses and his blank slate. May we always come before God in this manner.

“But he said, Yea rather, blessed are they that hear the word of God, and keep it.” – Luke 11:28

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In every thing give thanks:for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning you. – 1 Thess. 5:18

Life is full of monotony. In other words, our lives are made up of daily routines. And let’s face it: our routines can be pretty boring, and mine is no exception. I get up, use the restroom, get a glass of tea, sit in the recliner, read my Bible and pray, get dressed, make my lunch, leave for work at 7:15, and I arrive at the same time every day. There’s probably a rut forming in my daily path. And guess what? I do the same thing every day.

The evening is usually more of the same with some variety. It’s a little more fun because I get to spend time with my twin baby girls, but it still involves routine and monotony. When they were little, we even alliterated their routine: bath, bottle, bed. They don’t drink a bottle anymore, but we basically do the same thing every weeknight.

Most of life is this way. It’s full of monotony. The mountain tops and the adventures of our life are few and far between. In the meantime, we grind out the routines that make up the majority of life. This can lead to frustration and often depression. We wonder why our lives aren’t more exciting.

Recently, some trials have come into the lives of some of our friends that have refocused my perspective. A dear friend of mine that I’ve known my whole life found out a few weeks ago that his five year old daughter has cancer. They arrived home from a vacation to Disneyworld and she stopped breathing. They called an ambulance and eventually had to airlift her to a children’s hospital. In an instant their world was turned upside down. Now they begin the long road to recovery.

Another friend of my wife’s just died on the interstate. He was hit by a tractor trailer. He left behind four kids and a wife. Their lives were torn apart.

Stories like this bring new appreciation to the routines and methods in life. I am more thankful for bath time with the girls, chores around the house, normal conversations with my wife, and sweet tea in the mornings. A boring life is a blessed life. We are to be thankful to God in all circumstances, but it’s in the every day monotony of life that we should say extra thanks.

I am thankful for healthy daughters, a roof over my head, a job that I go to every day, and the freedom to worship. I am thankful for monotony.

Good times come and go and trials will visit us, but for this moment, let us bask in the boring. Let us be thankful for the dry deserts. Let’s cherish the comfortable.